BEIRUT ALAN BOWNE PDF

Goltira alzn Funding period Feb 12, — Apr 12, 60 days. Premier Logo Created with Sketch. AnnaRosa rated it it was amazing Jan 24, Meghana34 rated it really liked it Apr 22, An industrialist in the near future utilizes every means possible to get an inventor to sign over his revolutionary creation that will inevitably change the world. With the proper ID card, safety is right next door. Tim Janes rated it liked it Feb 26, Set in an apocalyptic future where a young man named Torch has been quarantined to a dark, squalid room on the Lower East Side of New York City, after testing positive for a nameless, sexually transmitted disease.

Author:Dailkree Moogum
Country:Kenya
Language:English (Spanish)
Genre:Automotive
Published (Last):16 April 2010
Pages:45
PDF File Size:4.91 Mb
ePub File Size:15.30 Mb
ISBN:294-1-40406-715-3
Downloads:97808
Price:Free* [*Free Regsitration Required]
Uploader:Mom



This style of theater and the fear and paranoia of AIDS in the early s seem tailor-made for each other. The basic scenario, and the searing afterimage of "Beirut," is of a seminude man and woman in a small, dark room, dissecting the nature of their relationship. He lives in a quarantine zone on the Lower East Side known as Beirut, and she leaves her Brooklyn home, at great risk, to break the quarantine and see him.

As drawn by Bowne, the duo are at an impasse: He aches for intimacy with her, but fears infecting her which, he notes, would be tantamount to murder. She aches for intimacy with him no matter the risks. There is a third character, played by Rick Kopps as an unwilling member of the "lesion patrol" sent to make random visits to the infected. Grimly sadistic, he forces humiliating inspections by flashlight. Bowne, though, wisely makes this plot strand a minor detour, keeping "Beirut" on track as an in-your-face look at a pair of lovers caught in an unforgiving vise.

The now year-old Rude Guerrilla troupe has chosen "Beirut" to inaugurate its Second Stage program. If "Beirut" is any indication, the new program should be a fruitful one both artistically and commercially. In his difficult, yet touching one act play, Beirut, the late Alan Bowne asks this question of his audiences. What the play wants to know are the limits of love, or, more specifically, what love must do to survive in the midst of a natural atrocity.

The story of Beirut is simple. A viral disease borne in the body fluids is ravishing the nation. A series of draconian health laws have been enacted in an attempt to stop the spread of the disease. These new laws include the criminalization of sex and pregnancy; under these laws, becoming pregnant carries with it a death sentence. Those infected with the virus are labeled […] and relocated to a concentration camp called Beirut.

He lives in a burned out apartment strewn with rubbish. He walks about the apartment all day long, wearing the same filthy pair of boxer shorts he occasionally uses to wipe his nose with. The only furniture he has is an old mattress, a bare light bulb hanging from the ceiling, a couple of votive candles and a clock radio. Occasionally, an inspector comes around to check his body for lesions.

In a New York minute, Blue strips down to her skivvies and begins teasing Torch mercilessly. Blue and Torch are [a couple], and more than anything else, Blue desires her [lover]; the risk no longer matters. Despite the horror of its setting, Beirut is actually a very sexy piece of theatre. These two are deeply in love, therefore the process that separates them is irrational. Torch is as much a part of her as are her breasts, or her legs, or her ears, for that matter. Her phantom pains are made even more excruciating by the fact that Torch is alive, and, at least for the moment, quite well.

In truth, the only thing separating these two is a law. AIDS had many victims in the eighties; some were gay, of course, but others were straight, despite the propaganda. One of the chief tragedies of AIDS is that it robbed a nation of its ability to express love; in the eighties, some folks even feared shaking hands with a gay person; they may be infected. Alex Walters plays Torch. Jami McCoy is an implacable force in this play; insistent, almost ruthless in her love.

Its lack of rage may be its chief asset, frankly. The s was a dark time in American history. There were many Americans who had a good reason for rage, and, perhaps, chief among them were AIDS victims. Alan Bowne chose, instead, to find love in the difficulty.

Beirut is a tender play, despite the anger that swirls about it. Set on the Lower East Side of a Manhattan divided by an unspecified plague, "Beirut" follows two disparate lovers. Torch Alex Walters is the infected hero, first seen fitfully sleeping on a mattress amid piles of crumpled pamphlets and federally issued canned goods.

Into this dank purgatory comes Blue Jami McCoy , his uninfected girlfriend, who has bluffed her way in by faking the posterior tattoo that denotes virus carriers.

This is verifiable since both spend much of the play in their underwear and less. Their graphic colloquy evolves into a plea for love in the face of annihilation.

Torch initially rebuffs Blue, who prefers risking her life with him to spending it alone. Elsewhere, his game production has its moments of raw punch, but the requisite urgency comes and goes. Walters and McCoy, more human-scaled than archetypal originators Michael David Morrison and Marisa Tomei, are certainly uninhibited and committed. Yet their over-studied accents and exposed technique denote still-forming characterizations.

The script loses intensity whenever outdated terminology and attitudes intrude on our awareness. Although "Beirut" still has social and histrionic value, its effect here is more sporadic than relentless.

Broadway, Santa Ana. Saturdays, 6 p. Ends Feb. Adult audiences. Running time: 1 hour. His food and electricity are rationed, his existence almost primitive: Clothed in boxer shorts, he eats out of cans by candlelight low-level incandescence nicely effected by Shannon Lee Blas.

Blue aches for intimacy with Torch despite all risks. The "plague" is never named, but it sounds an awful lot like AIDS, leaving us to wonder if this bleak future is indeed our own.

KEYNES HAYEK WAPSHOTT PDF

BEIRUT ALAN BOWNE PDF

This style of theater and the fear and paranoia of AIDS in the early s seem tailor-made for each other. The basic scenario, and the searing afterimage of "Beirut," is of a seminude man and woman in a small, dark room, dissecting the nature of their relationship. He lives in a quarantine zone on the Lower East Side known as Beirut, and she leaves her Brooklyn home, at great risk, to break the quarantine and see him. As drawn by Bowne, the duo are at an impasse: He aches for intimacy with her, but fears infecting her which, he notes, would be tantamount to murder. She aches for intimacy with him no matter the risks. There is a third character, played by Rick Kopps as an unwilling member of the "lesion patrol" sent to make random visits to the infected.

COMPUTER ORIENTED NUMERICAL METHODS V RAJARAMAN PDF

Alan Bowne

It can be reasonably assumed that such positives, so to speak, such as Torch Robert Rees , have a strain of the virus that is resistant to various medications. Not all medicines are ineffective. Whatever it is that Torch takes, it seems to slow down the increasingly debilitating effects of the syndrome. Increasing trepidation and plain ignorance in this futuristic society has caused whatever form of government still exists to enforce laws to this effect. In what is probably one of the most underwritten parts I have ever come across, he is not to be seen again until the curtain call, such that one is left wondering whether the inclusion of The Guard was even necessary. Blue is no shrinking violet, and the chemistry between the pair is highly convincing.

HIPERTROFIA DEL PILORO EN PEDIATRIA PDF

Beirut review

.

Related Articles