EPIKTET ENCHEIRIDION PDF

Wertvoller sind Informationen, die sich den Epiktet zugeordneten Schriften entnehmen lassen. Epiktet wurde um das Jahr 50 in Hierapolis im kleinasiatischen Phrygien geboren. Er wurde als Sklave nach Rom gebracht und stand dort im Dienst des Epaphroditos , eines wohlhabenden und einflussreichen Freigelassenen des Kaisers Nero. Wann und aus welchem Grund Epiktet nach Rom kam und zu welchem Zeitpunkt er freigelassen wurde, bleibt unklar.

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Arnold, E. V, pp. Bonhoeffer, A. Stuttgart, Giessen, Bruns, Ivo, De schola Epicteti. Kiel, XIII, ; pp. Colardeau, Th. Paris, Hartmann, K. XV, Lagrange, M. IX, ; pp. Oldfather, W. Cambridge, E. Bevan, E. Oxford, Brochard, V. Hicks, R. New York, Martha, C. Murray, Gilbert, Stoic, Christian, Humanist. London, Robin, L. Paris, , pp. Wendland, Paul, Philo und die cynisch-stoische Diatribe.

Berlin, Zanta, L. Zeller, E. Dilthey, Wilhelm, Gesammelte Werke, Vol. Groethuysen, Bernard, Philosophische Anthropologie. Saunders, Jason L. The Philosophy of Renaissance Stoicism. Wenley, R. Within our power are opinion, aim, desire, aversion, and, in one word, whatever affairs are our own. Beyond our power are body, property, reputation, office, and, in one word, whatever are not properly our own affairs.

Now the things within our power are by nature free, unrestricted, unhindered; but those beyond our power are weak, dependent, restricted, alien. Remember, then, that if you attribute freedom to things by nature dependent and take what belongs to others for your own, you will be hindered, you will lament, you will be disturbed, you will find fault both with gods and men.

But if you take for your own only that which is your own and view what belongs to others just as it really is, then no one will ever compel you, no one will restrict you; you will find fault with no one, you will accuse no one, you will do nothing against your will; no one will hurt you, you will not have an enemy, nor will you suffer any harm. Aiming, therefore, at such great things, remember that you must not allow yourself any inclination, however slight, toward the attainment of the others; but that you must entirely quit some of them, and for the present postpone the rest.

But if you would have these, and possess power and wealth likewise, you may miss the latter in seeking the former; and you will certainly fail of that by which alone happiness and freedom are procured. II Remember that desire demands the attainment of that of which you are desirous; and aversion demands the avoidance of that to which you are averse; that he who fails of the object of his desires is disappointed; and he who incurs the object of his aversion is wretched. If, then, you shun only those undesirable things which you can control, you will never incur anything which you shun; but if you shun sickness, or death, or poverty, you will run the risk of wretchedness.

Remove [the habit of] aversion, then, from all things that are not within our power, and apply it to things undesirable which are within our power. But for the present, altogether restrain desire; for if you desire any of the things not within our own power, you must necessarily be disappointed; and you are not yet secure of those which are within our power, and so are legitimate objects of desire.

Where it is practically necessary for you to pursue or avoid anything, do even this with discretion and gentleness and moderation. III With regard to whatever objects either delight the mind or contribute to use or are tenderly beloved, remind yourself of what nature they are, beginning with the merest trifles: if you have a favorite cup, that it is but a cup of which you are fond of—for thus, if it is broken, you can bear it; if you embrace your child or your wife, that you embrace a mortal—and thus, if either of them dies, you can bear it.

IV When you set about any action, remind yourself of what nature the action is. If you are going to bathe, represent to [19] yourself the incidents usual in the bath—some persons pouring out, others pushing in, others scolding, others pilfering. Thus death is nothing terrible, else it would have appeared so to Socrates.

But the terror consists in our notion of death, that it is terrible. When, therefore, we are hindered or disturbed, or grieved, let us never impute it to others, but to ourselves—that is, to our own views.

It is the action of an uninstructed person to reproach others for his own misfortunes; of one entering upon instruction, to reproach himself; and one perfectly instructed, to reproach neither others nor himself.

VI Be not elated at any excellence not your own. What then is your own? The use of the phenomena of existence. So that when you are in harmony with nature in this respect, you will be elated with some reason; for you will be elated at some good of your own. VII As in a voyage, when the ship is at anchor, if you go on shore to get water, you may amuse yourself with picking up a shellfish or a truffle in your way, but your thoughts ought [20] to be bent toward the ship, and perpetually attentive, lest the captain should call, and then you must leave all these things, that you may not have to be carried on board the vessel, bound like a sheep; thus likewise in life, if, instead of a truffle or shellfish, such a thing as a wife or a child be granted you, there is no objection; but if the captain calls, run to the ship, leave all these things, and never look behind.

But if you are old, never go far from the ship, lest you should be missing when called for. VIII Demand not that events should happen as you wish; but wish them to happen as they do happen, and you will go on well.

IX Sickness is an impediment to the body, but not to the will unless itself pleases. Lameness is an impediment to the leg, but not to the will; and say this to yourself with regard to everything that happens.

For you will find it to be an impediment to something else, but not truly to yourself. X Upon every accident, remember to turn toward yourself and inquire what faculty you have for its use. If you encounter a handsome person, you will find continence the faculty needed; if pain, then fortitude; if reviling, then patience. And when thus habituated, the phenomena of existence will not overwhelm you. It is restored. Has your wife died? She is restored. Has your estate been taken away?

That likewise is restored. While he permits you to possess it, hold it as something not your own, as do travelers at an inn. Begin therefore with little things. Is a little oil spilled or a little wine stolen? But it is not at all desirable for him, and very undesirable for you, that it should be in his power to cause you any disturbance.

XIII If you would improve, be content to be thought foolish and dull with regard to externals. Do not desire to be thought to know anything; and though you should appear to others to be somebody, distrust yourself.

For be assured, it is not easy at once to keep your will in harmony with nature and to secure externals; but while you are absorbed in the one, you must of necessity neglect the other.

XIV If you wish your children and your wife and your friends to live forever, you are foolish, for you wish things to be in your power which are not so, and what belongs to others to be your own.

So likewise, if you wish your servant to be without fault, you are foolish, for you wish vice not to be vice but [22] something else. But if you wish not to be disappointed in your desires, that is in your own power. Exercise, therefore, what is in your power. Whoever then would be free, let him wish nothing, let him decline nothing, which depends on others; else he must necessarily be a slave.

XV Remember that you must behave as at a banquet. Is anything brought round to you? Put out your hand and take a moderate share. Does it pass by you? Do not stop it. Is it not yet come? Do not yearn in desire toward it, but wait till it reaches you.

So with regard to children, wife, office, riches; and you will some time or other be worthy to feast with the gods. And if you do not so much as take the things which are set before you, but are able even to forego them, then you will not only be worthy to feast with the gods, but to rule with them also. For, by thus doing, Diogenes and Heraclitus, and others like them, deservedly became divine, and were so recognized.

Take heed, however, not to groan inwardly, too. XVII Remember that you are an actor in a drama of such sort as the Author chooses—if short, then in a short one; if long, [23] then in a long one. If it be his pleasure that you should enact a poor man, or a cripple, or a ruler, or a private citizen, see that you act it well.

For this is your business—to act well the given part, but to choose it belongs to another. But to me all portents are lucky if I will.

EL SERMON EFICAZ GRATIS PDF

Encheiridion

Arnold, E. V, pp. Bonhoeffer, A. Stuttgart,

R S SALARIA DATA STRUCTURE PDF

You have been given the principles that you ought to endorse, and you have endorsed them. What kind of teacher, then, are you still waiting for in order to refer your self-improvement to him? You are no longer a boy, but a full-grown man. If you are careless and lazy now and keep putting things off and always deferring the day after which you will attend to yourself, you will not notice that you are making no progress, but you will live and die as someone quite ordinary. From now on, then, resolve to live as a grown-up who is making progress, and make whatever you think best a law that you never set aside. And whenever you encounter anything that is difficult or pleasurable, or highly or lowly regarded, remember that the contest is now: you are at the Olympic Games, you cannot wait any longer, and that your progress is wrecked or preserved by a single day and a single event.

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