YAYATI BY V S KHANDEKAR PDF

Start your review of Yayati: A Classic Tale of Lust Write a review Shelves: indian-authors , indian-reads , philosophy , kindle-unlimited , tower-teams-iv , reading-challenge , world-lit , indian-reads , mythology I grew up, like most kids in India, on a steady diet of tales from Ramayana and Mahabharata and their allied tales. I still remember going up to my grandfather once he had finished listening to the news at 9 and asking him to continue with these tales. He must have told them to me innumerable times and yet I never got tired of listening to his soft melodic voice reciting it, so much so that even today when I read a tale from either of these two mythological stories, I remember him and miss him a I grew up, like most kids in India, on a steady diet of tales from Ramayana and Mahabharata and their allied tales. He must have told them to me innumerable times and yet I never got tired of listening to his soft melodic voice reciting it, so much so that even today when I read a tale from either of these two mythological stories, I remember him and miss him a lot. He was waxing poetic about this book and I was naturally curious. Apparently, my father had read the Tamil translation of this book, which used to appear like a series in one of the Tamil magazines that he used to subscribe to.

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Background[ edit ] In his preface to Yayati, Khandekar states that he was drawn to the original story from the Mahabharata at multiple levels, and for many reasons. Khandekar builds the original material into a full-length novel, adding several new episodes and developing the narrative as a love story with a theme of morality.

These include Mukulika and Mandar. The early life of Yayati is characterized by a number of disillusionment. He comes to know that his mother weans him for fear of losing her beauty. Later on he experiences cruelty and passion which in a sense challenges his manhood. He then has a fleeting experience of carnal love. After this he meets Kacha and sees in him a model of happy, peaceful life. It is, however, when his father, Nahusha, dies, that Yayati undergoes a traumatic experience and for the first time, realizes the destructive power of death, and is gripped with fear and helplessness.

While in this state of mind, he comes in contact with Mukulika, a maidservant in the palace. Precisely at this time, Yayati comes to know of a curse on his father, foretelling that he the father and his children shall never be happy.

Devayani decides to take revenge on Kacha by making advances to Yayati and ultimately succeeds in marrying him. Sharmishtha, originally a princess, is now living with Devayani as her maidservant. It is at this time that she comes in contact with Yayati.

While Devayani is unable to establish any rapport with Yayati, Sharmishtha finds union with him both in body and mind. This union begets a son and for sometime Yayati experiences happiness of life. However, Sharmishtha runs away from Hastinapur on a tempestuous night. Yayati now suffers estrangement from Devayani as well as loss of Sharmishtha.

This causes a vacuum in his life and he speedily advances on the path of moral degradation. Even when Hastinapur is attacked by the enemies, Yayati, because of his anger against Devayani and his life of sensual pleasures, continues to neglect his duties. His son Yadu is imprisoned. Puru, younger son of Yayati, manages his release. He requests his sons to lend him their youth. His son Puru comes to his help and lends Yayati his youth. At the end, Yayati hands over the reigns of government to Puru with all the blessings and seeks retirement to forest-life with Devayani and Sharmishtha.

In The Mahabharata, Nahusha is cursed by the Rishis sages to live on earth in the form of a serpent. After suffering for a long period in this fate, he eventually meets Pandava king Yudhishthira , who free him from the curse. In the novel, Nahusha is shown dying in his palace, desperately clinging to life.

He pleads to his wife and son to give him a few hours of their own lives so that he may live a little longer. He fears death for he still has unfulfilled desires. While in the novel, Yayati can return the youth of his son only at the cost of his life. Yayati represents an attitude of material pleasure-seeking. Devayani shows excessive involvement in power and pride. Sharmishtha stands for undemanding, selfless love while Kacha symbolizes a clean, moral and moderate enjoyment of life with a sense of well-being of the human race.

Yati, rejecting of all material pleasures, is presented as counterpoint to Yayati. The Malayalam translation, by P. Madhavan Pillai, was serialized in the Malayalam weekly Mathrubhumi in , and published in book form the same year.

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Yayati: A Classic Tale of Lust by V S Khandekar

Telegram Tales from Mahabharata have this quality that you can read them over and over again. Every time you read them you get more drawn to them. They are simple stories of characters whose lives are intertwined, leading to a whole set of dilemmas at every point in time. Characters have to make choices all the time, between what they want and what duty calls, between good and bad, between bad and worse, between good and better, between ego and devotion.

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Chandra gave rise to the lunar dynasty or the Chandravanshi Dynasty. Pururavas ruled over the city of Pratishthana. He married Apsara Urvashi and had many sons, of whom Ayus was the eldest. Ayus completed his education from Sage Chyavana and married the Asura princess Prabha.

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