GLISSANT POETICS OF RELATION PDF

Born in Martinique in , Glissant earned a doctorate from the Sorbonne. Some of the metaphors of local identity Glissant favored--the hinterland or lack of it , the maroon or runaway slave , the creole language--proved lasting and influential. InPoetics of Relation, Glissant turns the concrete particulars of Caribbean reality into a complex, energetic vision of a world in transformation. He sees the Antilles as enduring suffering imposed by history, yet as a place whose unique interactions will one day produce an emerging global consensus.

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In January , Glissant was asked by Jacques Chirac to take on the presidency of a new cultural centre devoted to the history of slave trade. While his first novel portrays the political climate in s Martinique, through the story of a group of young revolutionaries, his subsequent work focuses on questions of language, identity, space, history, and knowledge and knowledge production.

For example, in his text Poetics of Relation, Glissant explores the concept of opacity, which is the lack of transparency, the untransability, the unknowability. And for this reason, opacity has the radical potentiality for social movements to challenge and subvert systems of domination.

Glissant demands for the "right to opacity," indicating the oppressed—which have historically been constructed as the Other—can and should be allowed to be opaque, to not be completely understood, and to simply exist as different.

However, Glissant rejects this transparency and defends opacity and difference because other modes of understanding do exist. That is, Gliisant calls for understanding and accepting difference without measuring that difference to an "ideal scale" and comparing and making judgments, "without creating a hierarchy"—as Western thought has done.

This image conveys emptiness sparked by unknown identity as it feels deep and endless. This image parallels the Biblical story of Jonah and the Whale, realizing the gravity of biblical references as the Bible was used as justification for slavery. More literally, Glissant related the boat to a whale as it "devoured your existence".

As each word a poet chooses is specifically chosen to aid in furthering the meaning of the poem, the word "Falling" implies an unintentional and undesirable action. This lends to the experience of the slaves on the ship as they were confined to an overcrowded, filthy, and diseased existence among other slaves, all there against their will.

Slave ships did not prioritize the preservation of cultural or individual history or roots, but rather only documented the exchange rates for the individuals on the ship, rendering slaves mere possessions and their histories part of the abyss.

This poem also highlights an arguable communal feeling through shared relationship to the abyss of personal identity. As the boat is the vessel that permits the transport of known to unknown, all share the loss of sense of self with one another. Upon losing exchange value, slaves were expelled overboard, into the abyss of the sea, into another unknown, far from their origins or known land.

This "relation" that Glissant discusses through his critical work conveys a "shared knowledge". Referring back to the purpose of slaves—means of monetary and property exchange—Glissant asserts that the primary exchange value is in the ability to transport knowledge from one space or person to another—to establish a connection between what is known and unknown.

He is notable for his attempt to trace parallels between the history and culture of the Creole Caribbean and those of Latin America and the plantation culture of the American south, most obviously in his study of William Faulkner.

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Poetics of Relation

Start your review of Poetics of Relation Write a review Shelves: criticism-and-research I have read different sections at different points over the last two years. I will continue to reread it and let its wisdom and proximity to Relation sink in. There is a documentary Manthia Diawara made about his conversations with Glissant on an ocean voyage across the Atlantic I need to check out next. The keys for me are: abyss, arrow-like vs. An excerpt from a research paper I wrote on this methodology: Edouard Glissant, in his text Poetics of Relation, finds it impossible and limiting to attempt to grasp the world, or all its peoples, in any type of system, or to simply assimilate all working classes into one universal, political melting pot of humanity Glissant A beautiful methodology which breaks down constructs of worldview and, in essence, helps us stop playing God and to get on with embracing others, being oneself an "other".

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Édouard Glissant

Born in Martinique in , Glissant earned a doctorate from the Sorbonne. Some of the metaphors of local identity Glissant favored--the hinterland or lack of it , the maroon or runaway slave , the creole language--proved lasting and influential. In Poetics of Relation, Glissant turns the concrete particulars of Caribbean reality into a complex, energetic vision of a world in transformation. He sees the Antilles as enduring suffering imposed by history, yet as a place whose unique interactions will one day produce an emerging global consensus.

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In January , Glissant was asked by Jacques Chirac to take on the presidency of a new cultural centre devoted to the history of slave trade. While his first novel portrays the political climate in s Martinique, through the story of a group of young revolutionaries, his subsequent work focuses on questions of language, identity, space, history, and knowledge and knowledge production. For example, in his text Poetics of Relation, Glissant explores the concept of opacity, which is the lack of transparency, the untransability, the unknowability. And for this reason, opacity has the radical potentiality for social movements to challenge and subvert systems of domination. Glissant demands for the "right to opacity," indicating the oppressed—which have historically been constructed as the Other—can and should be allowed to be opaque, to not be completely understood, and to simply exist as different.

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